“In the United States, about one out of every six people aged 14 to 49” This directly from the CDC website.

Please do not downplay HSV by skewing the numbers or saying almost everyone already has it. That simply isn’t true. HSV-1, yes. HSV-2, not even close.

http://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htm

HSV1 and HSV2 are different strains and they act differently. HSV2 can increase your risk of contracting other diseases including HIV and can be life threatening (and has indeed taken lives) in rare cases.

“EFFECTS ON THE BRAIN AND CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
Herpes Encephalitis. Each year in the U.S., herpes accounts for about 2,100 cases of encephalitis, a rare but extremely serious brain disease. Untreated, herpes encephalitis is fatal over 70% of the time. Respiratory arrest can occur within the first 24 – 72 hours. Fortunately, rapid diagnostic tests and treatment with acyclovir have both significantly improved survival rates and reduced complication rates. For those who recover, nearly all suffer some impairment, ranging from very mild neurological changes to paralysis. The best chances for a favorable outcome occur in patients who are treated with acyclovir within 2 days of becoming ill.
Herpes Meningitis. Herpes meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes that line the brain and spinal cord, occurs in up to 10% of cases of primary genital HSV-2. Women are at higher risk than men for herpes meningitis. Symptoms include headache, fever, stiff neck, vomiting, and sensitivity to light. Fortunately, herpes meningitis usually resolves without complications, lasting for up to a week, although recurrences have been reported.”

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/genital-herpes/possible-complications.html

Not to mention that condoms do not offer 100% protection from the transmission of HSV (or HPV). More like 30% – 50%. Any touching of genital to genital can transmit the disease (scrotum, for instance).

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=415195&resultClick=3

And one more informative article really worth the read. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/herpes-simplex/print.html

Understand that the complications that can arise from HSV-2 are very unlikely but they do still exist. Inform yourself and give yourself the power to make an informed decision.